Thursday, July 08, 2010

Lobster bisque, fer sure!


Recently, we ate at a kinda new restaurant that featured Cajun style food. Zeus ordered a bowl of lobster bisque. Presentation was fine, rather over sized white bowl with a thick black soup.

We stared at it.

We looked at each other?

Zeus gave it a taste.

Hmmmmm, takes like beef broth, something sharp like A-1 sauce and not a piece of lobster in sight.

I take a taste. Wow, I have never have lobster bisque with a dark broth. NOPE, doesn't even taste like lobster.

We ate our meal, left the restaurant, not very happy but guessing that it would be a long time before we returned.
Zeus went to work that night and on the way home stopped by the place to talk with the manager. He spoke to the guy on duty and said that he just was unhappy with the soup.
The young man, in charge, said, "Yeah, I never order that."

There are so many things wrong with the above story besides my sentence structure which is pure me.

While in Cape Cod, Zeus ordered Lobster Bisque, at a well know restaurant. The above picture is what he got. A familiar color, thick with lobster pieces and delicious.

So, I'm asking my blogging buddies, from the south. When you order Lobster Bisque, how does it come, dark and beefy looking and tasting like a lobster wasn't even within two miles of the place or cream colored, thick with lobster pieces and delicious.

I mean, if this is a Cajun thing and we miss understood, fine. If I need to stop by and have a talk with the chef, let me know.

I roll with a lot of the little stuff in life but when it comes to food...............well...............waving my pointy finger here, don't try to fool me.
:) Bea Who thinks that preparing food is always a form of creating.

7 comments:

  1. I'm in Georgia which is pretty south and I've NEVER seen lobster bisque that wasn't somewhere between cream/pinkish/yellowish. I think the cook had a brain fart the day you ate there! LOLOLOL

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  2. When you do a cajun soup it starts out as a roux that is darkened to just about a brown black color...gumbo style! They should never have called it a bisque!

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  3. My mouth started watering the moment I saw this bowl of bisque...I know that I am not really hungry but your photo makes me want some soup :O)!!!! Welcome home dear friend! Imagine and Live in Peace, Mary Helen Fernandez Stewart

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  4. HEh Bea - Good to be home? I'll take the photo of the soup - which certainly is nothing like what you describe Zeus' experience with the blackish soup. Though I am anything but from the south, I have travelled enough to know that there isn't a lobster bisque in the world that wouldn't be a lovely golden-red hue.

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  5. HEh Bea - Good to be home? I'll take the photo of the soup - which certainly is nothing like what you describe Zeus' experience with the blackish soup. Though I am anything but from the south, I have travelled enough to know that there isn't a lobster bisque in the world that wouldn't be a lovely golden-red hue.

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  6. Thank you for the comments and you are so right...my mother used to say "do not write a check too big for your mouth to cash" . Time is the main gift and yes I am behind on my full moon work...I am hoping to create 13Moons with the 13 images cross hated together to form a larger work. Well at least that is what the plan is. Have a great weekend. I do not think the bisque Ken and I had in SC last summer was that dark...but I loved it any way. It is not heart smart so once a year is probably OK. Imagine and Live in Peace, Mary Helen Fernandez Stewart

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  7. A bisque is creamy and lobster bisque is always yellowish to reddish, from my experiences. Gumbo would be like the broth style. But, either one would always have lots and lots of lobster in it, with mushrooms, onions, celery or whatever. I've had it in Maine, Cape Cod, California,Louisiana, and here in Texas and it never was like you described he had there. The Cajun style bisque I had was more reddish and hotter, that was the only difference.

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