Saturday, November 07, 2009

Getting Arboreal: A Nature Collection 11.8.09

BUR OAK Quercus macrocarpa Family: Beech (Fagaceae)

Tall straight trunk, distinct nearly to top, branches and twigs thick, nearly horizontal lower branches, upper branches ascending, broad round crown.
Bark is dark gray, deeply furrowed with many ridges. It's thick corky bark allows it to withstand prairie fires. It's a member of the white oak group. It's species name is Latin, with macro for "large" and carpa for "finger" referring to the large terminal leaf lobe.
It can often be found standing alone like this one, left by the farmer, hopefully out of respect for it's age. At one time these corn fields were Oak Savannah's and prairie. Groups of these marvelous trees stood together weathering the elements and fire. This is also called Blue Oak or Mossycup Oak and grows in the southern three-quarters of the state of Wisconsin.
This tree is on one of the back roads I often take. The Bur Oak on my header is from the farm down the road from my house. I have a fondness for both these trees.
Oh, heck, I have a love affair with trees. There is a slide show at the top right hand corner of my blog. If you have the time or interest give it a click, sit back and hopefully enjoy, my trees. Thanks for taking the time to visit and see MY TREE.
:)Bea

32 comments:

  1. I also love trees. I have a lot of quotes about trees, two of my favorite written by the poet Minnie Aumonier...." There is always Music amongst the trees in the Garden, but our hearts must be very quiet to hear it." AND "...trees are poems that earth writes upon the sky."
    I enjoy your tree photos Bea. Keep 'em coming! :)

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  2. "There is always Music amongst the trees in the Garden, but our hearts must be very quiet to hear it." AND "...trees are poems that earth writes upon the sky." Yvonne that's just beautiful, thank you for sharing that with me. I need to read her poems. :)Bea

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  3. you know, bea, just today I was thinking about the poem "trees" by joyce kilmer. So funny you should post this. I love trees. As a child I'd climb one daily in the summer and eat my lunch up in the branches -- just me and my tree.

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  4. Teri, grab your comic books and come climb the old apple tree with me. There are lots of good apples up here! :)Bea

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  5. I love your update to the collaboration, Bea! The location of your tree is as if she is greeting all who pass by..what beautiful photos!

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  6. Thank you Julie. When I come down the road and see her standing there she makes me smile. :)Bea

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  7. Oh! I like the way the trunk is a little twisted, that's very cool, thanks for showing us.

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  8. Thank YOU, JGR for stopping by! :)bea

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  9. Trees. I'm a little behind on reading posts and after reading all you know about trees, I was reminded of the "tree lady"
    A few years ago, PenDot wanted to widen a road, a twisty country road, the kind you like. They wanted to cut down a tree, the old twisty kind, the kind you like. The "owner" if you can say anyone owns trees, was a 90-something year old woman. She climbed that tree and stayed. Someone built her a little tree house and she stayed in that tree. There were signs protesting PenDot, signs of encouragement for that brave woman.
    And, do you know, she won! She is dead now, but the tree is still there on the unwidened, twisty, country road.
    Just an idea of what you could be doing in 30-something years!
    Mucho Love-o, Lisa

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  10. Lisa, Lisa, Lisa, I don't know anybody that has my interests to heart like you do. :) To think you are planning activities for me when I'm 90. It' boggles my mind. lololsnort :)Bea

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  11. What a fantastic tree... I love oaks... thanks for sharing information along with the photos!

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  12. Thanks for stopping by Di! :)bea

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  13. What a fantastic tree! And you shared so much more than your photos. Thanks for that.

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  14. Such strength and power in your tree. Great choice!

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  15. You are welcome Leslie. It's like introducing you to an elder. I think we should show proper respect for their age and "wisdom".
    :)Bea

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  16. Thanks Seth. I bet there are some powerful trees in that beautiful grouping you took, too. :)bea

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  17. Love your tree, it's powerful presence and the lovely background. Is that corn? It's so beautiful, with a majestic feel! Thanks for sharing your special tree.

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  18. you are a wondrous blogger...loving the Alice illustrations & quotes...and loving your favorite trees!

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  19. Thank you Dianne, I'm glad you are enjoying them as much as I am. They seem to speak to us, don't they? I once read somewhere that the Red Queen was the most quoted character from a book. :)Bea

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  20. I adore vererable old trees - had a number of favorites on my old property - Huge maple, two enormous elm (which finally died); a big catalpa and a wonderful horse chestnut.
    New property has pines which I am not as fond of, altho they are lovely in the snow and wind. I think what I like about the diciduous trees is their seasonal reminders.

    Lovely post Bea.

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  21. Oh Bea, I truely love your trees. The first one is spectacular and so breath taking. Also, love the lone standing one, and I like you, hope the farmer left it because of the its age! Was in Wisconsin in October and so love the state.

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  22. What a unique tree! That bark is so knarly, man (hee hee). Thanks for sharing!

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  23. thank you for sharing so many GREATTTT photos. love the ones of the trunk. FANTASTICO! wanda

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  24. Marilyn, I see so many lone trees at the edge of fields around here I HOPE that the farmer saves them because of their beauty and not because it's too much work to cut them down. :)Bea

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  25. Dear Club, it's very knarly, dude. :)Bea

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  26. Wanda, I am so glad you stopped by and enjoyed the trees. :)Bea

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  27. One time when I was looking to buy a house, I told the estate agent I wanted a garden with trees, lots of them. Oh, and some sort of house I suppose!!

    I love all the trees we have on our land here. We are surrounded by them. At the bottom of the orchard is a little wild area full of aspens. I just love the sound their leaves make when the wind blows. Super post, lovely photos, gorgeous tree.

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  28. Yes, Jill, that's corn. There are a number of corn fields still standing. I don't know if it's because they are waiting for it to dry more, food for the deer, or they just don't know what they are going to do with it. :)Bea

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  29. Yes, Jill, that's corn. There are a number of corn fields still standing. I don't know if it's because they are waiting for it to dry more, food for the deer, or they just don't know what they are going to do with it. :)Bea

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  30. Gina, I love, love the sound that Aspens make. :)Bea

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  31. i, too, love trees...it was hard to choose one for this collaboration...i love how old and worn yours is...and the details of the trunk...so neat to check out trees from all over...

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  32. If a tree could only tell stories!
    What part of the prairie is this? You may have said and I missed it...I'm in Kansas and see these lone trees often. Beautiful!

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